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The ventilation of stables is very important. There are two common ventilation systems in horse stables design

The ventilation of stables is very important. There are two common ventilation systems in horse stables design

2020-07-27


In this article, China best livestock equipment manufacturer, Desing livestock farming equipment factory, will go through introduction to horse stable ventilation for horse equpment.


At present, the common horse barn ventilation system is mainly divided into two types: natural ventilation and mechanical ventilation.


In winter, horse stable usually uses the natural ventilation system, because the temperature difference between inside and outside horse stable is large, it can use the principle of hot buoyancy for ventilation.

In summer, natural breezes and mechanical exhaust fans are used for ventilation.


In winter, horse stables usually use a natural ventilation system that takes advantage of the buoyancy of the air and the influence of natural winds to reduce temperature, humidity, and exhaust gas density.


Natural ventilation systems are quieter than mechanical ventilation systems and provide more daylight to the barn, but require more manpower to manage and maintain stability in temperature and air quality.



Fresh air enters horse stables on the left through an exhaust pipe under the eaves, and waste gas is discharged from the chimney.

During the cold months, the natural ventilation system relies on the thermal buoyancy of the air to remove heat, moisture, and air pollutants from horse stables.


Whether horse stable has a natural ventilation system depends on the structure of the building.

The orientation of the building must be perpendicular to the prevailing wind.

Obstacles around horse stables will prevent fresh air from entering the stables, preferably at a distance greater than 10 times the height of the stables.

If obstacles cannot be removed, mechanical ventilation should be used.


Another problem with natural ventilation systems is that water vapor tends to condense on building surfaces.

When warm, moist air rises and is evacuated from horse stable, the air touches the colder roof and water drips down from the roof, possibly causing damage to the building and discomfort to the horse workers and horses.


The natural ventilation system must establish the proper density of the horses' arrangement and the height of the roof, as these two factors determine the generation of thermal buoyancy.

The use of mechanical ventilation systems in horse stables means that the air exchange and the average air distribution are done mechanically.


The heat resistance of horse stables should be up to RSI 3.5(R-20).

Since each fan works to create a small vacuum in the barn, all openings (including gaps in the surrounding Windows and doors) can be a source of small airflow.


For this reason, it is important to design an adequate intake so that the incoming air is heated as quickly as possible before reaching the horse and/or the exhaust fan to improve its water holding capacity.

Stables should be 25 CFM (cubic feet per minute) per horse in winter and 300 CFM in summer.

If the number of horses in the stables is below 15, a commercial fan with the minimum power (about 300 CFM) will be sufficient to provide basic ventilation and provide sufficient supplemental heat to maintain a level of continuous air exchange during the winter months.

High ventilation rates are necessary because air exchange rates, not number of horses, determine air quality in stables.


Ideally, the stables should be ventilated at least twice an hour to ensure good air quality.

However, many stables are only allowed to change their air once an hour because of the need to minimize the cost of ventilation and heating.

In general, the winter ventilation rate of 40 CFM per horse means one ventilation per hour.



  • Horse stables should be 25 CFM (cubic feet per minute) per horse in winter and 300 CFM in summer.

  • If the number of horses in horse stables is below 15, a commercial fan with the minimum power (about 300 CFM) will be sufficient to provide basic ventilation and provide sufficient supplemental heat to maintain a level of continuous air exchange during the winter months. High ventilation rates are necessary because air exchange rates, not number of horses, determine air quality in stables.


  • Ideally, horse stables should be ventilated at least twice an hour to ensure good air quality. However, many stables are only allowed to change their air once an hour because of the need to minimize the cost of ventilation and heating. In general, the winter ventilation rate of 40 CFM per horse means one ventilation per hour.

  • An air inlet is a chute opening, that is, an opening at the top of the outer wall, that brings air through or through pipes in the attic area above the ceiling.

  • If the air intake is well planned, the barn can be windowed.

  • But installed windows must be ventilated according to the temperature or wind changes to ensure that the adjacent compartment is adequately ventilated.

  • Air exchange needs to provide 0.2 square meters of air intake per 472 l/s (1000 CFM).


  • Some horse stables use a duct ventilation system to distribute fresh air evenly throughout horse stables.

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